Breast feeding a down syndrome infant-Breastfeeding JoseeTen Tips For Breastfeeding A Baby With Down Syndrome | The Milk Meg

First, congratulations on the birth of your new special baby. Second, congratulations on making the choice to breastfeed your new baby. How wonderful that you want to give your baby the gift of your milk. Right now, you are probably struggling with conflicting feelings. At the same time, you may have feelings of disappointment, anger, helplessness, even guilt.

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

You can't hold your baby all the time. Finding out that your child has Down syndrome can be shocking and heartbreaking. Josee Hope continues to grow beautifully and has no medical issues. If you would like to read Breast feeding a down syndrome infant whole diagnosis story click here. You may want to ask your doctor or a lactation professional about using a nipple shield. They may be able to supply you with details of local support groups for parents. Support should be available to help you if you want to breastfeed syndtome child.

Homme cherche femme extraterreste. Why do babies with Down’s Syndrome find it harder to breastfeed?

Unfortunately many medical staff do not have the knowledge or experience to support women who would like to breastfed their child with Down syndrome but are having issues, and parents can be left to Breasg through this difficult time alone. I believe it had a huge impact on her ability to breastfeed from the word go and for Breast feeding a down syndrome infant to bond immediately. Josee Hope continues to grow beautifully and has no medical issues. How do I introduce a bottle to my breastfed baby? The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding Eighth edition. Sign Up. As a parent, you have a right to interview potential physicians to find the best one for you. Mohrbacher, N. However, babies with Down syndrome not only benefit from breastfeeding, but they can breastfeed successfully, too. A Czech men nude shield may make it easier for your baby to latch on and breastfeed.

Genna, Catherine Watson, editor.

  • Through seeking support and her own motivation to breastfeed, she is still breastfeeding Josee today at 20 months old.
  • However, it is true that newborns with Down syndrome are at a higher risk for certain complications.
  • It can be overwhelming and difficult to learn that the child you are expecting, or the child you just delivered has Down syndrome.

Congratulations on the birth of your baby! Although everything may not be as you expected, or wished for, you are not alone and will find lots of support as you and your family care for your little one and help him or her grow and learn. Normally, the nucleus of each cell of a baby's body contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, half of which are inherited from each parent. Down syndrome occurs when some or all of a person's cells have an extra full or partial copy of chromosome The exact reason why this occurs is not yet known.

Breastfeeding helped with my bonding to James initially when my world was turned upside down by his arrival. The extent to which children are affected by Down syndrome varies widely.

If you have just discovered that your baby has Down syndrome, you may be experiencing mixed emotions. This is very natural as you wonder what lies ahead for you and your baby. Each Australian state and territory has a branch of the Down Syndrome Association see below for details. They may be able to supply you with details of local support groups for parents. Your medical adviser will also be able to provide you with information about access to early intervention programs in your area.

The best solution is to talk to other mums who have actually experienced your situation. Breastmilk is nature's food for all babies. It provides food, comfort and stimulation of all of baby's senses. Babies with Down syndrome have an increased risk of infection, particularly respiratory infections 1 Your breastmilk contains anti-infective factors including antibodies against germs that you and your baby are exposed to.

Babies with Down syndrome often have low muscle tone. The muscles of your baby's lips, tongue and face are all toned and strengthened by breastfeeding 2 In these ways, breastfeeding helps prepare your baby for eating other foods and for speech development 3. The Australian Breastfeeding Association ABA has a booklet, Breastfeeding: your premature baby , which contains detailed and up-to-date information, plus mothers' comments and stories, photos and suggestions.

This booklet can be purchased from the Australian Breastfeeding Association. If your baby has difficulties breastfeeding at first, persistence and time will often help him and you to learn. Many babies need extra help to breastfeed. Mums of babies who are having difficulty learning to breastfeed are encouraged to express and feed baby breastmilk, while teaching baby with the help of a skilled lactation consultant. I was encouraged by the Early Intervention Centre to breastfeed because it helps with lip closure and can discourage tongue thrusting as the child gets older.

The ABA has a booklet, Breastfeeding: your baby with Down syndrome , which contains detailed and up-to-date information, plus mothers' comments and stories, photos and suggestions. There are also further reading suggestions at the end of this page. Maternity units in many large hospitals employ lactation consultants, while others work in private practice.

Babies with Down syndrome tend to have low muscle tone and so may have trouble getting their mouth around the nipple and attaching correctly to the breast 4 Some babies may also have trouble coordinating their sucking, swallowing and breathing and may gulp as they feed.

They may get less milk for their efforts and they often get tired quickly. This can and will improve with time and patience. Breastfeeding itself will improve your baby's muscle strength, which will help compensate for the low tone.

At least 3 soft or runny bowel motions every 24 hours. Babies older than 6 weeks may have fewer bowel motions. Some growth in weight, head circumference and length. Note that there are special growth charts for babies with Down syndrome details at end of article. Start your milk flowing before you put your baby to the breast, so that she will not have to spend energy sucking with little result.

Gentle hand expressing, rolling your nipple between your thumb and forefinger, gentle massage and perhaps a warm face washer on the breast will encourage your milk to let down and also soften the areola to make it easier for her to attach. It is important that your baby is well positioned at your breast and that her body is well supported. If she uses as little energy as possible to hold her head and neck up, this will allow her to use her energy for growing. You can use pillows to hold her up high enough so that her mouth is level with your nipple.

Using an extra pillow to raise her bottom to near the level of her head may help if low muscle tone is causing sucking problems. In the early weeks Tamsyn would make gaspy, choky noises during feeds. You can hold your baby lying on her side across your lap, her chest facing yours, her lower arm around your waist, so that she does not have to turn her head to grasp the nipple. Some mothers use a sling to hold their baby's body in a C-shape keeping her head and bottom tucked in.

Alternatively, you may like to use the 'underarm hold'. Put a pillow at your side and another pillow across it and your lap. Rest your baby's bottom on the first pillow and support her back on your forearm while you cradle her head in your hand.

You can try different feeding positions, until you find one that suits your baby. Your baby may also be helped if you support your breast and her chin while she feeds. Cup your hand under your breast, then slide it forward so that three fingers support your breast. Make a U-shape with your thumb and first finger and support your baby's jaw in that U.

This is called the Dancer Hand position. Human babies, including those with Down syndrome, are born with the instinctive knowledge and ability to get themselves to their mother's breast and to attach themselves correctly, with their mother's support.

Spending one-on-one, skin-to-skin time with your baby when you are learning to put her to the breast will help to allow these 'baby-led attachment' instincts to work. If you get the chance, you may like to try this technique as described in this article with your baby, as you and she are learning to breastfeed.

There are techniques such as cup-feeding and aids such as nipple shields, which may be helpful. Make use of all the support services available including your local Australian Breastfeeding Association counsellor. Pisacane, A. Acta Paediar 92 12 ,— Dowling, D.

Breastfeeding the infant with special needs. New York: March of Dimes Foundation. Buckley, S. Thomas, J. Breastfeeding the hypotonic infant. Breastfeeding Med 2 2 ,— Email: info downsyndrome. Email: info dsav. Web: downsyndromevictoria. Email: support dsansw. Email: office dsaq. Email: info downsaa. Web: downssa.

Email: admin downsyndroment. Email: admind actdsa. Email: admin dsawa. Growth Charts for Children with Down Syndrome. Volume Available at: www. European study: Growth charts for Down's syndrome from birth to 18 years of age, Myrelid, A. Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Skip to main content. Breastfeeding your baby with Down syndrome Congratulations on the birth of your baby! Breastfeeding can be an important step in the early months and years of your baby's life. The importance of breastfeeding Breastmilk is nature's food for all babies. Breastfeeding hints Babies with Down syndrome tend to have low muscle tone and so may have trouble getting their mouth around the nipple and attaching correctly to the breast 4 Some babies may also have trouble coordinating their sucking, swallowing and breathing and may gulp as they feed.

It is important that you make sure baby is getting enough milk. Signs of this include: At least five heavily-wet disposable nappies, or six pale, very wet cloth nappies in 24 hours At least 3 soft or runny bowel motions every 24 hours. Good skin tone. If you are worried about any of these, see your medical adviser immediately. Attaching your baby to your breast Start your milk flowing before you put your baby to the breast, so that she will not have to spend energy sucking with little result.

References Pisacane, A. Last reviewed:. Mar

Breastfeeding Babies with Special Needs. Newborns with Down syndrome may give very subtle feeding cues if they give any at all. There are many factors that play into this decision, including whether or not you feel your body is producing enough milk, whether or not your baby has health complications, and whether or not you plan to return to work soon after delivery. Our little babies with Down syndrome are often underestimated right from the word go, be prepared for your child to surprise you and those around you with their determination and fighting spirit. I believe it had a huge impact on her ability to breastfeed from the word go and for us to bond immediately. Speak with your lactation consultant to see if you can find a position that suits you both.

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant. What Should I Look In a Pediatrician?

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How to breastfeed a baby with Down’s Syndrome | Mother&Baby

First, congratulations on the birth of your new special baby. Second, congratulations on making the choice to breastfeed your new baby. How wonderful that you want to give your baby the gift of your milk. Right now, you are probably struggling with conflicting feelings. At the same time, you may have feelings of disappointment, anger, helplessness, even guilt. Allow yourself time to process these feelings of grief, remember that your baby is a baby first and a baby with special needs second.

It offers the perfect nutrition to keep your baby as healthy as possible, and be strong for any surgeries or treatments they may need. Often a baby with special needs is reluctant to take the breast; you and baby will need extra kinds of support while nursing. Let your medical team know that you are determined to breastfeed. Your partner, other family members and friends, your lactation consultant and your LLL Leader can back you up.

If you want to give your milk to your baby, try to breastfeed right away. Be prepared to be patient, it may take a few weeks for your baby to learn how to properly latch on. You should pump as often as a baby would breastfeed, every two to three hours during each hour period; setting an alarm will help keep you on schedule.

The pumped milk can be given by other feeding methods. Ask your Leader or board-certified lactation consultant about getting an at-breast nursing supplementer system. These systems hold your milk in a small bottle or bag with a thin tube attached to carry the milk to your baby. The tube may be taped to your breast, so your baby can get extra milk while learning to breastfeed.

Or you may tape the tube to a finger and let the baby suck on your finger to get milk. Some health care providers may be unfamiliar with this method.

Tell them about why it is important to you and your baby. Keep trying to breastfeed, if at all possible. Oftentimes your doctor will want you to supplement a slow-gaining baby. Extra patience and reasonable expectations are critical when breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome. Special Needs. Home Breastfeeding Info Special Needs.

My new baby was born with special needs. Can I still breastfeed? Breastfeeding promotes closeness between mom and baby, creating a special bond. This will especially help in the grieving process that can be associated with a Down syndrome diagnosis. Tips to breastfeeding your baby with Down syndrome: Extra patience and reasonable expectations are critical when breastfeeding a baby with Down syndrome. To make sure your baby gets the nutrients that she needs and establish your milk supply, it may be necessary to wake her every two hours for frequent feedings at least times per day.

Make sure your baby is fully awake before feeding, you can do this with extra touch and stimulation throughout the feeding session. Switch nursing is very beneficial if your baby falls asleep at the breast. If your baby starts to lose interest in the breast, break the latch and offer the other breast. Keep repeating until he seems satisfied. Pay extra attention to positioning your baby at your breast. If gulping and choking are a problem, try positioning your baby so that his head is higher than his bottom.

The football and laid-back position can be helpful. Poor muscle tone may make it difficult for your baby to latch on well, including reduced muscle strength in their tongue and lips.

It is very important to offer good head support during breast feeding. There are a variety of ways you can hold your baby to support his head, neck, and back. The Dancer hand position is especially beneficial to babies with low muscle tone. Using the hand on the same side as the breast you are offering, cup your breast with your thumb on one side of the breast, palm beneath, index finger pointing outward, and the other three fingers on the other side of the breast.

Babies with Down syndrome may have a protruding tongue that can push against your nipple. This may pose a challenge for your baby when latching on, as he may push the nipple out of his mouth.

If your baby is latched on properly, you should be able to see his tongue cupped under the breast, resting on his lower gum. When you are latching your baby onto the breast, watch for his mouth to open wide, with his tongue forward and down. This opening of the jaw will cause the tongue to protrude further out of his mouth.

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant

Breast feeding a down syndrome infant