Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon-

Scripture: Romans I am been a big C. Lewis fan and I am so glad that so many people are begin exposed to his ideas in and through this movie which has become a cultural event. Ok, show of hands, how many of you have read the book? How many of you have seen the movie?

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon

Search Amazon here! Aslan is a lion — the Lion, the great Lion. Reepicheep the mouse — three feet talland have intelligence, emotion, and the ability to make moral choices. Aslan is a lion — the Lion, the great Lion. By the way, those parallels Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon not accidental or incidental. Sections of this page. She has gone to see Tumnus. Download Sermon with PRO. Aslan is the Jesus figure throughout the entire Narnia story. Aslan is taking the girls to go gather reinforcements.

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Getting their feet wet with Dec 04, PM. Either your sister is telling You've been inactive for a while, logging you out in a few seconds Scholastic, p. Lewis 1, ratings, average rating, 19, reviews. Dec 09, PM. Resurrection introduced new life--the hallmark of Christianity. Mar 23, AM. Oct 21, AM. Susan notices Aslan's Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon on the night they leave the Stone Table, and with Lucy she follows him as he trudges sadly toward the place of his sacrifice.

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Scripture: Isaiah So…are you enjoying our journey through Narnia thus far? Last week Sandy, our Narnia tour guide, gave us a brief overview of the land of Narnia. First imagined in the mind of CS Lewis, it has now been visited by millions of readers since Narnia is a very different world from ours, but in many ways very similar!

Narnia is full of many intriguing creatures. Some very familiar to us… beavers, bears, field mice, rabbits, etc. Some not so familiar to us… centaurs, fawns like Mr. Tumnus , dwarfs, giants, unicorns, etc. Today, I want to introduce you to two of my favorite characters in LWW. I know Aslan is the star of Narnia, the Lord of the Woods Truths that I hope will be as helpful to you as you continue your walk with God as they have been for me.

For you to fully appreciate LWW, you must understand something about Narnia. A world in crisis In Narnia…ALL the creatures who live here have been drawn into the war. Long ago, Narnia was created by Aslan. Son of the Great Emperor. But Jadis, the White Witch has invaded Narnia and ruled in evil destruction. There is an underground level of communication that goes on behind the scenes.

One of the first Narnian creatures the children meet is Mr Beaver. They all saw it this time, a whiskered furry face which had looked out at them from behind a tree. Instead, the animal put its paw against its mouth just as humans put their finger on their lips when they are signaling to you to be quiet.

Then it disappeared again. The children all stood holding their breath. Only when it had led the children into a dark spot where four trees grew so close together that their boughs met and the brown earth and pine needles could be seen underfoot because no snow had been able to fall there, did the beaver begin to talk to them.

As you continue reading LWW Sermon Topics: Narnia. Weekly Sermon Collections. Online Sermon Editor. Geared to help you draw out and apply the powerful scriptural truths found in C. View all Sermons. A lot like earth, huh? Lots of people like you. Meet the Cast: MR. Download Sermon with PRO. Talk about it Nobody has commented yet.

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Cara 1, books view quotes. But I think Lewis meant for his story to be deeper than allegory. I'm Still Here! Like Quote. He's the King, I tell you. There is no fear of God before their eyes.

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon. This Quote Is From

Lewis that chronicle the adventures of English children in the land of Narnia. My children love the adventure stories of other children and I enjoy the sound practical lessons and theology woven by Lewis throughout the stories. I offer here three noteworthy lessons from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe , the first installment of the Narnia series. He tells them they are going against logic to assume that Lucy is lying about the magic wardrobe that leads to the magical country of Narnia even though Peter and Susan made a failed attempt to reach Narnia in the wardrobe themselves.

For the moment then and unless any further evidence turns up, we must assume that she is telling the truth. So Professor Kirk is teaching the children something about what it means to judge rightly. This is not the mistaken notion that we should not judge at all but rather it is teaching how to judge as Saint Joseph did to Mary when she was found to be with child.

The Mosaic Law would have condemned Mary as a sinner, and indeed, what further proof would one require that she was not? She was not married, yet she was pregnant. One can only imagine that Joseph applied his personal knowledge of her and was humble enough to realize that here were things afoot that he did not comprehend.

This is exactly the logic the Professor applied to Lucy. It can at first appear to be a denial of logic or of the facts. But the same could be said of Saint Joseph. Lewis uses this episode to introduce children to the difficulties inherent in judging the actions of others. Lewis also in this story teaches us how to cope with the concept of wonders, even invisible and incomprehensible ones.

Faith The first talking animal the children meet in Narnia is a Beaver, who brings them to his dam. Aslan, however, is only a memory at this point. He has not been seen in Narnia for generations. The last one hundred years have been ones of tyranny and persecution in Narnia under the despotic and severe rule of the White Witch. Many creatures have given their allegiance to the Witch who certainly has power on her side, even if she is not the legitimate ruler of Narnia. Many animals, however, have remained loyal to the true King and the belief that He will come and set all to rights.

Beaver is an example of one of the faithful animals and he keeps his faith alive through the knowledge and recitation of little poems, old rhymes as he calls them. Beaver has a quiet and confident faith that Aslan will return, as the songs say. He focuses on the promised return of Aslan rather than the horrible times in which he finds himself.

The Beaver is ready for Aslan because he has been anxiously expecting him for his whole life. But Mr. Beaver has been expecting him in large part because of his faith in, and knowledge of, the old songs and sayings. By following the example of Mr. Beaver, children and adults can learn to find the strength and endurance gained through faith.

Sin and Responsibility The steady but rapid decline of Edmund is wonderfully portrayed by Lewis. Edmund is a bad boy, but he is not thoroughly wicked. He serves as a morality tale to those who would flirt with sin.

At the beginning of the book he is pointedly interested in finding snakes and Peter alludes to Edmund being a bully at school. Online Sermon Editor. Continue reading this sermon illustration Free with PRO. Your Viewing History Browse All. Online Sermon Editor Free for pastors and preachers. Premium Series Kits. Having trouble logging into your account?

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Protect your website with Sucuri! Click here to return to the Sermons page. Just out of curiosity, how many of you here this morning have ever read any of the Narnia books? Have any of you read all of them?

I was first introduced to these wonderful books as a child. I had two older sisters who were both avid readers, and they both loved the Narnia books. If you have never read the books and you are interested in checking them out, this would be a good one to start with. It was the first book that Lewis wrote in the series, and it does a good job of introducing you to Narnia and many of the main characters.

I am a big movie buff, and I love the Narnia Chronicles, so I am very excited. The other books in the series do too, but this book in particular has some very clear and striking parallels with the Christian faith. By the way, those parallels are not accidental or incidental.

The author, C. Lewis, was a committed Christian. And so it is no accident that you can find all these amazing parallels in the books. The Chronicles are rich with Christian teaching and allegory and often very moving in their portrayals of faith, sacrifice and love, all from a biblical perspective.

These books have played an important part in my own life and my own growth and understanding of the Christian faith. As I mentioned, I first read them as a child, but then I also re-read them in my teen and college years. Rose and I read them through together early in our marriage.

And now I have the great fun of reading them out loud as a parent to my children — for the second time through! And believe me it is a lot of fun. When a character shrieks, we shriek, when Aslan roars, we roar, and Lewis makes these books a lot of fun to read out loud. So what exactly are these Chronicles of Narnia? Some of you know them well, but this may be all new for many of you. The Chronicles are a series of seven books that deal with the comings and goings of a number of children from mid-twentieth century England into a whole other world called Narnia.

There the children have all sorts of adventures as they help the good people and talking animals of Narnia through difficult journeys and perilous times. They also encounter a marvelous talking lion named Aslan. Aslan rules over all, and he is the one who makes it possible for the human children to pass from their world into Narnia and back again.

They are fantasy books, and yet like so many works of fantasy, they contain important truths that resonate deeply with the real world in which we live. Fantasy literature often allows us to glimpse new insights into our own world by opening up whole new perspectives that we would otherwise miss. And because the Narnia Chronicles contain so much Christian truth and beauty, they also help us to gain new insights into the world of Scripture and our Christian faith.

So let me introduce you briefly to Aslan the Lion. Aslan is the ruler over all Narnia. He comes and goes as he pleases, but he is always present, guiding the various events that take place, giving help and support to his followers at their greatest times of need. Yes, you heard me right — they are talking with a Beaver.

This is one of the fun aspects about the world of Narnia. Narnia, unlike our own world, has both regular animals and talking animals. The talking animals are larger than their non-talking counterparts ex. Reepicheep the mouse — three feet tall , and have intelligence, emotion, and the ability to make moral choices.

Peter felt suddenly brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delicious smell or some delightful strain of music had just floated by her. And Lucy got the feeling you have when you wake up in the morning and realize that it is the beginning of the holidays or the beginning of summer. Tell us about Aslan! Beaver sternly. I tell you he is the King. Aslan is a lion — the Lion, the great Lion. And so Aslan is not a tame lion. He is wild and free and strong, and yet he loves the good people and animals of Narnia, and they love him back.

A different girl named Jill encounters Aslan for the first time in the fourth book of the Chronicles called The Silver Chair. Jill has just committed a terrible deed. Now she is dying of thirst and the Great Lion lies on the ground between her and a stream of water. For a long time she stands still, terrified of moving any closer. The Lion bids her come and drink.

It just said it. Jill finally comes and drinks from the stream and is refreshed. Aslan then summons her forward, leads her through a time of confession, and then lovingly restores her. Strong, fierce, majestic, loving and good — who exactly is this Aslan?

Lucy is heartbroken. And how can we live, never meeting you? You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there. Think it over and let me know your answer. And of course from a Christian perspective we see that Aslan is representative of Christ.

Some people have viewed Aslan as an allegory of Christ, but Lewis did not view Aslan as allegorical. Of course in drawing his picture of Aslan in the world of Narnia, Lewis drew heavily from his knowledge of God and Jesus from Scripture, especially from the gospels. You might wonder why Lewis chose for Aslan to be a lion rather than a man or some other animal. The world of Narnia is populated by many creatures. Like our world there are different races of people in Narnia and a wide variety of animals, birds, and fish.

But Narnia has so many other creatures as well. We have mentioned the talking animals, but there are also fantasy animals like unicorns, centaurs, griffins and fauns.

There are marsh-wiggles and mermaids, and giants and dwarfs. There are terrible creatures like Dragons and Giant Lizards.

There also evil creatures like witches and wraiths, ogres and hags. Lewis obviously had many choices for the incarnation of Aslan in Narnia.

But he chose a lion. Well, one reason is that Lewis was a stickler for symbolism. The lion is a fitting symbol for Christ in many ways. The lion is a symbol of royalty.

It is the King of the Beasts. The lion is an animal of extraordinary beauty, agility and strength. And that is because the Bible itself uses the symbol of a lion for royalty, for power and indeed even as a symbol for Christ in our world. The lion was a well-known symbol of royalty in Biblical times.

Ezekiel The lion has roared — who will not fear? The tumult will resound to the ends of the earth, for the LORD. The peaceful meadows will be laid waste because of the fierce anger of the LORD.

Like a lion he will leave his lair, and their land will become desolate. Our Advent Scripture reading this morning came from Genesis , one of the earliest prophecies about Christ. Those verses compared the tribe of Judah to a lion, and prophesied that a ruler would come forth from the tribe of Judah. Jesus fulfilled this prophecy. He came from the tribe of Judah, and he is the ruler over all the nations.

He is wild and free and strong. His power and majesty fill the universe. He does what he pleases and no one can thwart his plans. He is the King of kings, the Lord of lords, the judge over all the world. Is he a tame lion? They came on and saw that it was a Lamb. Suddenly the Lamb changes right before their eyes. John wept because there was no one who able to open the scroll. See, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has triumphed.

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon

Lion witch and wardrobe beaver sermon